Problems of parent and subsidiary corporations under state statutory law
Read Online
Share

Problems of parent and subsidiary corporations under state statutory law

  • 817 Want to read
  • ·
  • 31 Currently reading

Published by Little, Brown in Boston .
Written in English

Subjects:

Places:

  • United States

Subjects:

  • Subsidiary corporations -- United States -- States.,
  • Holding companies -- United States -- States.,
  • Corporation law -- United States -- States.

Book details:

Edition Notes

Other titlesStatutory law--state
StatementPhillip I. Blumberg and Kurt A. Strasser.
SeriesThe law of corporate groups
ContributionsStrasser, Kurt A.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsKF1465.Z95 B59 1995
The Physical Object
Paginationxxxix, 878 p. ;
Number of Pages878
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL1131455M
ISBN 100316099902
LC Control Number94077903
OCLC/WorldCa31945517

Download Problems of parent and subsidiary corporations under state statutory law

PDF EPUB FB2 MOBI RTF

Problems of parent and subsidiary corporations under statutory law of general application. Boston: Little, Brown, © (OCoLC) Document Type: Book: All Authors / Contributors: Phillip I . Get this from a library! Problems of parent and subsidiary corporations under statutory law specifically applying enterprise principles. [Phillip I Blumberg; Kurt A Strasser]. Additional Physical Format: Online version: Blumberg, Phillip I., Procedural problems in the law of parent and subsidiary corporations. Boston: Little, Brown, © Parent and subsidiary corporations: Liability of a parent corporation for the obligations of its subsidiary [Powell, Frederick J] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. Parent and subsidiary corporations: Liability of a parent corporation for the obligations of its subsidiaryAuthor: Frederick J Powell.

to the subsidiary’s creditors under various state and federal statutes, or under contracts among the parties. In addition, untangling the affairs of the parent and subsidiary, if the latter is going to reorganize under chapter 11 and be owned by its creditors, can be difficult. All of these issues may, in fact, lead to. of incorporation,2 the claims against the parent and subsidiary will sometimes be brought in the subsidiary's state of incorporation. Subsidiaries are often created for the purpose of limiting the liability of the parent corporation. The principle of limited corporate liability is deeply rooted in corporate law . situations where a parent is shown to control the subsidiary to the extent that the subsidiary is a mere alter ego of the parent and the parent uses the subsidiary for some wrongful purpose, the protection of limited liability can be removed—an act referred to as “piercing the corporate veil.” 6. Where a plaintiff does not. 4. See. Blumberg. larly, a "subsidiary corporation" under Anglo-American and civil law. Yet the "subsidiary" I is an important instrument in the de-velopment of international commerce - the key to the expansion of an existing corporate enterprise from one country to another. An essential factor in this expansion is the assurance that the.

  Generally, a subsidiary of a company has independent legal personality and undertakes independent debts. However, if the parent entity and subsidiaries have highly mixed corporate personality and the cost to distinguish property is too high, which damages the fair repayment of creditors, the court can decide to "pierce the corporate veil" of a limited company and order the parent . Explore books by Phillip I. Blumberg with our selection at Click and Collect from your local Waterstones or get FREE UK delivery on orders over £ Subsidiary directors must follow the same regulations and corporate laws as normal corporation directors. Directors are not required to report to the board of directors of the parent company. While subsidiary company directors are allowed to manage the company as they see fit, the parent company can remove the directors in the event of. CORPORATIONS ACT - SECT 46 What is a subsidiary. A body corporate (in this section called the first body) is a subsidiary of another body corporate if, and only if: (a) the other body: (i) controls the composition of the first body's board; or (ii) is in a position to cast, or control the casting of, more than one-half of the maximum number of votes that might be cast at a general meeting.